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Acquisition is hard, and getting more difficult all the time. Experiencing acquisition success requires that we, first, understand the nature of the relationship we have with donors, and then implement a process that respects that relationship. Organizations who successfully navigate that process will have a far greater chance for success in their acquisition efforts and investments.

5 Questions to Help You Instantly Improve Donor Acquisition

if you’re ready to overcome the challenges of acquisition by understanding the nature of the relationship you have with donors, here are five questions that can help:

1. What is the relationship between your donors and beneficiaries?

As we addressed last week, there are two types of organizations when it comes to acquisition. Are your donors and beneficiaries one and the same, or an entirely different set of people? Some organizations have both, which requires that strategies be followed that will be needed for each segment of prospective donors.

2. Where in the acquisition process are prospects getting lost?

Do you have enough impressions? Are impressions not leading to contact information? Are contacts not engaging? Are you asking too quickly? Identifying where the breakdown is occurring will help you zero in on the strategies you need to help prospects take the next step.

3. Is your value proposition clear to donors?

Do they see value in forming an ongoing relationship with your institution or organization? How can your stories and/or content encourage more people to engage with you?

4. What will provide the greatest impact on acquisition at the lowest possible cost?

The best way to improve acquisition is to address each issue one a step at a time. Impressions are expensive. Are there ways to better leverage existing impressions before you go to the expense of creating new ones?

5. How can your other fundraising activities support your efforts to improve acquisition?

Mid-level and major gifts can go a long ways to shortening break even points and improving acquisition ROI.